all papers written from scratch

24/7/365 support

no plagiarism - GUARANTEED

Free Birth Control Essay Sample

← Application for Transfer to Boston College Public Records versus Individual Privacy →

Buy Cheap Birth Control Essay

Birth control is one of the most significant and controversial issues in the modern society. It is difficult to ignore it because the situation is that the planet is overpopulated, and some countries simply lack of enough living place. At the same time, some nations become desolate because many people cannot or do not want to have children. Hence, it is important to find out whether birth control should be adopted or whether it is unnecessary.

The first and primary argument for birth control is overpopulation. It causes two major problems, such as famine and accommodation shortages. It is mostly evident in Africa, India and China. For instance, millions of people are suffering from starvation in Africa, and the population is increasing constantly, although food production rate is low. Birth control could partly solve the problem of food shortages. In such countries as India, China and Bangladesh, the density of population is extremely high. The number of inhabitants is permanently increasing, but the territory of the country remains the same. As a result, people do not have enough space for living, and have to emigrate from their motherland. Recently, Indian and Chinese governments have encouraged women to become sterilized by granting bonuses (Larsen, 2002). Although it may seem to be a violent measure, it benefits the large families that are unable to keep themselves.

Another argument for birth control is unwanted pregnancy. Young people rarely care about the possible consequences of their promiscuous sexual relations, which often result in unwanted children. Unfortunately, in most cases, young women have to abandon the unwanted child, or make abortion rather than bring it up. In the modern society, birth control is the only way out for the juvenile pregnancy prevention. It would decrease the number of abortions, as well as abandoned children. Birth control would allow people to choose when they want to be parents themselves.

The third argument is a benefit for taxpayers. Unwanted pregnancy rate in the USA is one of the highest in the world. Most women, who get pregnant without intention, are mainly low-income and teenaged. They cannot keep themselves and need governmental backing. According to Thomas & Monea (2011), “taxpayers spend about $12 billion annually on publicly financed medical care for women, who experience unintended pregnancies, and on infants, who were conceived unintentionally”. Birth control can help not only those women, who do want to have children yet, but also taxpayers.

Arguments against birth control are mostly based on religious or moral convictions. Religious figures consider birth control unnatural and anti-life. Most of them think that contraception separates sex from reproduction, which is immoral, and prevents a fetus from being conceived. Moralists claim that birth control leads to mass sexual immorality, and having sex outside marriage. Moreover, it is violent to prevent women from having children deliberately. Eventually, birth control popularization may lead to the establishment of the new generation, which would have sex purely for pleasure, instead of reproduction.

The second argument against birth control is a danger for health. Abortions and even some birth control pills may have a harmful effect on woman’s health. Unsuccessful abortions are especially risky, and can lead to infertility that would destroy the further life of a woman.

Both birth control supporters and the opponents have reason in their arguments. From the utilitarian point of view, it is preferable to adopt birth control in the countries with a high population rate. At the same time, some birth control methods are immoral with regard to women and religion. Coming to an agreement and finding the golden mean concerning this issue would be the best decision for the world community.

References

  1. Larsen, J. (2002). Plan B updates. Earth Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.earth-policy.org/plan_b_updates/2002/update18
  2. Thomas, A., & Monea, E. (2011). The high cost of unintended pregnancy. Brookings, 45. Retrieved from             http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2011/7/unintended%20pregn            ancy%20thomas%20monea/07_unintended_pregnancy_thomas_monea.pdf

Related essays

  1. Public Records versus Individual Privacy
  2. Application for Transfer to Boston College
  3. US History Since 1965
15% first order  Order now  close