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“The Lost Boy” by Thomas Wolfe is a fascinating and moving retell of episodes in Wolfe’s childhood. It is a story about Wolfe’s brother named Grover during a trip in the 1904 to the time he met his death after suffering from typhoid. The story is told from four perspectives with each point of view showing the sentiments expressed by different family members. The story is a moving valediction of Wolfe’s literary skills in developing a moving lament. Lament as expressed is not only for the lost youth, hope and innocence, but also of lost time. It is an essential discovery of emotions that run in people’s mind long after one of them departs. Thomas manages to make Grover a memorable creation through a vivid recreation of development of the themes of death, remembrance, and love.

Grant is made a memorable creation and a loving boy whose bright light burned out too soon. Through the recounts of his family member’s, we are able to see that they loved him much. The mother’s love was great because even thirty years after Grover’s death, she was still developing emotional states. Grover’s death still lingered on her mind and as depicted in the narrative, she says that the death was so long ago but she could still remember it like it happened yesterday (Wolfe & Skipp, 2009). She feels that nothing is the same as it was when Grover was alive. Her love makes her see Grover the way he was and the way he looked on the day they went through Indiana to the Fair. Love is also eminent in his sister’s, brother and father’s use of language.

Death as a theme is brought out through the boy’s story. At the age of 12, Grover died of typhoid fever in 1904 after his family members had gone to the World’s Fair in St. Louis. Part 2 of the story begins 30 years after the boy’s death where we are told of the mother’s grief even after thirty years. The sister’s point of view also indicates how Grover’s death affected her. She recounts instances when they were happy together for example when they sneaked to eat at a cheap restaurant (Wolfe & Skipp, 2009). Death robbed her off her friend.

Remembrance is seen in part two when Grover’s mother still remembers him 30 years after his death. The grieving mother reflects on her son and recounts to Wolfe the excitement of their trip to the World Fair and how it indicated her son’s maturity (Wolfe & Skipp, 2009). Through out this part of the narrative, the author brought out the whole story through remembrance. It enables us to see the mother’s demonstration of life’s irreparable wounds. Part three also brings out the theme of remembrance since we are able to see and follow her older sister’s adventures at the Fair. She recounts how she and Grover sneaked into downtown ST. Louis to eat at a cheap restaurant. Through her sister’s remembrance we are able to confront her long sustained grief and guilt. We see her vision of incomprehensible life and how nothing turns out the way we want them to.

Conclusion

Thomas Wolfe manages to make Grover a memorable creation through a vivid recreation of development of the themes of death, remembrance, and love. The story is about Wolfe’s brother named Grover during a trip in the 1904 to his death. It is told from four perspectives with each point of view showing the sentiments expressed by different family members from the father to Grover’s older sister. The themes of death, remembrance, and love are highlighted by Wolfe so that the reader can manage to have the same emotions experienced by Grover’s family members.

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