all papers written from scratch

24/7/365 support

no plagiarism - GUARANTEED

Free Head to Head-Print Photographs Essay Sample

← On Pornography by Gore Vidal Expanding Opportunity in Higher Education →

Buy Cheap Head to Head-Print Photographs Essay

The essay written by Svokos shows the problems that are associated with keeping photos in digital format. Her essay is a lamentation of how the digital era robs precious memories, or the way the memory ought to be preserved in film photos. Her conclusions were prompted by a crash of her computer that caused her to lose all of her photos that she had stored in digital format and the memories captured in them. The photos that she has lost cannot be replaced because the events, such as her mother’s 50th birthday party or her trip together with her sister to the Great Wall of China, have passed by.

In this age, she writes, people no longer look at photos in printed form by passing them to each other while seated at a table, but rather by swarming around a laptop to view Facebook photos, which have been enhanced and decorated with frames. Flawed photos can not be encountered in an electronic photo album because they are deleted the moment they are taken. It is impossible to find photos of an uncle suffering from constipation in a family album. Photos can be improved and made perfect by removal of red eyes and pimples with a help of a computer program. The digital era is an era of seeking great satisfaction from a photo that has just been taken. This means that one can no longer wait to feel the excitement that comes with waiting for a film photo to be developed and printed. The digital camera robs one of the anticipation related with the film camera. This is because it is possible to view a picture that has just been taken, and if it is not appealing another one can always be taken and the imperfect one discarded. This is shallow because it beats reason, as to why one would want to see a photo that has just been captured yet the event is still fresh in one’s mind. It defies the logic of capturing memories in a photograph.

The digital era has eliminated the excitement that grows in one when he gets the film from a local drug store. One does not crave for tearing the envelope containing the photos before he can get home or into the car. Not knowing how the photos will come out like gives meaning to capture the memories. Having choice in how what photos to keep or not also adds excitement. The element of surprise is ruined when digital cameras are used for capturing the moments.

Digital photographs do not elicit eagerness when remembering the time a photo has been taken because the photo is viewed immediately after it is captured.  There is also no pressure to make a shot count in digital camera. The enthusiasm rises in the people who are being captured as well as in the one taking the photo when using a film camera. Svokos (2009) insists that “There is something incredibly exciting about the one-shot chance you get with a film camera” (Svokos, 2009, Para 5). This is because the shot has to count, otherwise the photo is imperfect. But according to her, the more flaws, the more reality and excitement it generates.

One cannot afford to waste an opportunity to take the right photo with a film camera because it offers no warning when the picture is taken or when to smile hoping that the photo will not be blocked by anything. What is captured in the picture is a part of it and can not be erased. Svokos argues (2009) that the reasons discussed above have prompted her to buy a film camera and produce some of her best photos with it. The film camera helps her to preserve photos by printing them and show them to her kids by giving them the real pictures instead of an online link to a photo album (Svokos, 2009, Para 6).

When the digital photos are lost one can only wish they had captured them in a film because they would have been preserved by printing. One can even go through them and smile about the life’s moments captured in them the old fashioned way. This gives one satisfaction despite the photos being imperfect with creases, smudges, and torn at the rims. Failure to take photos robs one of the ability to hold the photos by leaving them at the mercy of technology where they can be “altered, enhanced, touched up and even get lost forever” (Svokos, 2009, Para 7).

Related essays

  1. Expanding Opportunity in Higher Education
  2. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories
  3. On Pornography by Gore Vidal
  4. Human Sexuality Supportive Credit
15% first order  Order now  close